Updates – City of St. Petersburg Rental Protections

Updates – City of St. Petersburg Rental Protections
(April 1, 2022)

 

In the City of St. Petersburg, you have the additional rights as a tenant. The St. Petersburg City Council has determined that violations of the following four (4) additional rental protections are illegal, and landlords can be fined a monetary penalty for violations.

NOTICE OF LATE FEES NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Landlords must provide tenants with written notice of any late fee that is assessed. This notice must be delivered by email, certified mail, posting or hand-delivery.

The Notice must include a statement informing the tenant of the following four things:

  1. A late fee has been incurred
  2. Justification for the charge
  3. The amount of the fee and, if applicable, a statement explaining the rate at which fees will continue to accrue
  4. The location in the rental agreement which establishes the amount for which late fees are determined (for example, the paragraph number in the lease)

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Landlords must provide tenants with a copy of the Notice of Rights in Housing before the move in date.

21 DAYS’ WRITTEN NOTICE REQUIRED TO TERMINATE MONTH TO MONTH TENANCY

Landlords must provide tenants with 21 Days’ written notice if they intend to terminate a month to month tenancy.

In Florida, a landlord who wants to terminate a month-to-month rental agreement (a rental agreement that does not contain an end date and the tenant pays rent monthly) must give the tenant a written notice at least 15 days before the end of a rental period. However, a county or city may enact an ordinance that requires a longer notice period, and St. Petersburg has done this.

If you live in the City of St. Petersburg and your rental agreement is a month to month tenancy (your rental agreement does not contain an end date and you pay your rent monthly), then you or your landlord can terminate the tenancy by giving not less than 21 days’ written notice.

“SOURCE OF INCOME” DISCRIMINATION IS PROHIBITED

Landlords cannot discriminate in housing because of the source of the tenant’s income.

Federal Law prohibits discrimination in housing based on Race or Color, National Origin, Religion, Familial Status, or Handicap.  Additionally, in Pinellas County, discrimination in housing is also prohibited if based on Sexual Orientation.

Now, in the City of St. Petersburg, Housing discrimination based upon the “source of your income” is prohibited and illegal.

Please note that this does not mean that a landlord must provide you with a rental unit at the amount you are able to pay, and it does not mean that a landlord is prohibited from denying you a rental unit for other legitimate reasons, such as rental history.

 

If you think you may receive an eviction notice or need help with a housing legal issue, request services online from GLS.

These questions and answers are provided for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. Legal advice cannot be given without information about your specific situation. 

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